An Estonian yoga teacher, 33, says she can orgasm without stimulation

The yoga teacher taught herself to feel an orgasm “almost instantly” and without any stimulation – and scientists insist that she does not pretend.

Caroline Tsarski from Estonia studied for ten years to achieve “deep sexual pleasure” because normal sexual intercourse was considered painful. She claims she can now orgasm for up to 10 minutes without any stimulation.

The 33-year-old girl, whose abilities have been described in detail in a scientific journal, believes that every woman has the power to “awaken” their “orgasm energy”.

Medical tests seem to have proved that Ms. Tsarskaya, who takes £ 60 from clients for an hour and a half of advice on how to liven up her sex life, did not lie.

And the video of the amazing experiment shows a panting Mrs. Tsarsky writhing on the hospital table for examination.

She claims to have mastered the ability to culminate without any stimulation “over the years of yoga and tantric training”.

In a video of one of the experiments where she reached orgasm, Caroline Tsarsky said she believes that “every woman” can achieve this.

This chart shows how Carolyn Tsar evaluated her orgasm across different erogenous zones.  NGSO refers to orgasms not stimulated by the genitals.  Each orgasm is assessed on three subscales.  Touch (orange bar) refers to how an orgasm is felt according to 13 different adjectives, such as “pulsating,” with a possible 65 points.  Affective (red bar) is an assessment of how an orgasm is felt in terms of emotional intimacy and ecstasy from a possible score of 45. A score (blue bar) rates a pleasant pleasure and relaxation of an orgasm from 30. This shows that she rates her NGSO as similar to clitoral orgasm from a sensory point of view, but lower in terms of its emotional closeness and ecstasy than its other culminations

This chart shows how Carolyn Tsar evaluated her orgasm across different erogenous zones. NGSO refers to orgasms not stimulated by the genitals. Each orgasm is assessed on three subscales. Touch (orange bar) refers to how an orgasm is felt according to 13 different adjectives, such as “pulsating,” with a possible 65 points. Affective (red bar) is an assessment of how an orgasm is felt in terms of emotional intimacy and ecstasy from a possible score of 45. A score (blue bar) rates a pleasant pleasure and relaxation of an orgasm from 30. This shows that she rates her NGSO as similar to clitoral orgasm from a sensory point of view, but lower in terms of its emotional closeness and ecstasy than its other culminations

WHAT DOES SCIENCE SAY ABOUT FEMALE ORGASM?

Orgasm is a feeling of strong sexual pleasure that occurs during sexual activity.

According to the NHS, this can also be called “impending” or “culminating”.

Both men and women experience orgasms.

For women, there is no biological advantage to orgasm because it is believed that it does not play a role in conception.

It is believed to be a purely enjoyable experience with no other benefits.

Female orgasm is a complex neuroendocrine process that is unlikely to have developed by accident.

The researchers asked Ms. Tsarsky to rate her climax on the orgasm scale used in sexual research.

The results showed that she rated her orgasm without genital stimulation – the way she learned – almost as pleasurable as clitoral or anal.

However, they did not provide the same level of emotional intimacy and ecstasy as the usual climaxes.

Further analysis showed that doctors measured her hormone levels to see if her own orgasms really had a measurable effect on her body.

The experiment was conducted three times at weekly intervals.

Each time Ms. Tsarsky took a blood test 30 minutes before the test, immediately after orgasm and 30 minutes after the test.

For the first time Mrs. Tsarskaya brought herself to a climax without stimulation for five minutes.

She did the same thing a second time, but instead for 10 minutes.

In the last test she sat and read a book for 10 minutes to act as a test.

Blood tests showed her prolactin levels rose 25 percent immediately after her five-minute orgasm.

Prolactin is a hormone that, according to previous studies, is produced by women after orgasm.

During a 10-minute orgasm test, prolactin levels were 48 percent higher immediately after menopause.

In blood samples taken from a control test for reading books, a significant increase in prolactin levels was not observed.

It was noted that Ms. Tsarsky’s prolactin level was particularly high on the day of the 10-minute tests.

The lead author of the study, psychologist James Pfaus, explained that this may be due to the fact that Ms. Royal is in a certain phase of her menstrual cycle.

No other hormone measured in blood samples showed such a significant increase as prolactin.

In a video taken immediately after she reached her climax and referring to it in a magazine, Ms. Church said, “What I just did, I know every woman can do.”

Earlier in the scientific literature, so-called orgasms not stimulated by the genitals (NGSO) were reported.

But the debate over the veracity of such an experience, and such orgasms can be measured.

Usually the stimulation of erogenous zones of the body combined with the mental aspect of arousal and sexual desire leads to orgasm in both men and women.

But women have reported orgasms in non-sexual situations, such as during sports / exercise or breastfeeding.

Ms. Tsarsky, who is cited as a co-author of the study, said her path to orgasm without stimulation began to struggle with her vaginismus, an uncontrollable condition where the vagina suddenly and painfully tightens when something is inserted inside.

She began her training in yoga tantra with: “learn body posture, breathing techniques, body fixation, aimed at learning to awaken and feel energy, and then learn to control it and move up.”

“I also did exercises for the pelvic floor, chest massage exercises and exercises to get rid of shame and guilt.

“I learned to relax and unwind, took on a body image and brought increased attention also to daily life in general”

Ms. Tsarsky said the sexual benefits emerged later as she trained, which allowed her to overcome vaginismus.

The study is published in the journal Sexual Medicine.

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